Image Gallery





Shell ear discs or pendants from Duyong Cave, Philippines (calibrated 4,300 BCE).
Notice the natural spirals.  (From Peter Bellwood, Man's Conquest of the Pacific, 1979)


Patterns on ear discs from Somrong Sen Neolithic.  (From Peter Bellwood, Man's Conquest of the Pacific, 1979)


Spiral designs from the Jhukar culture of the post urban period.
 


The practice of ear elongation with ear discs continues to present times among the mountain peoples of Northern Luzon and Southern Mindanao in the Philippines. The same types of ornaments are found in Hindu, Buddhist and Jain sculpture. (From Edward Dozier's Mountain Arbiters, 1966)
 


Ban Chiang red painted pottery with spiral and 'yin-yang' spiral designs.  (From Peter Bellwood, Man's Conquest of the Pacific, 1979)
 
 


'Mt. Meru' designs on Ban Chiang bracelets from 2000-1000 BCE. (From Joyce C. White, Ban Chiang: discovery of a lost bronze age, 1982)
 


Similar designs from Harappa.
 
 


Multiple bangles from Harappa.


Multiple bangles wrapped in cloth from Ban Chiang.  Skeletons from Ban Chiang often have the forearms encircled with bangles. (From Joyce C. White, Ban Chiang: discovery of a lost bronze age, 1982)
 


Almost all animal figurines from Ban Chiang, like these above, and most of those from other SE Asian sites are of bovines. At Ban Chiang, remains of the zebu and water buffalo were scattered throughout the site.  The concentration on bovines, in an area very rich in animal life, signifies some cultural, probably religious, importance. (From Joyce C. White, Ban Chiang: discovery of a lost bronze age, 1982)

A zebu sacrificial table from Yunnan (800 BCE-200BCE). (From Charles Higham, The Bronze Age of Southeast Asia, 1996)


'Mother Goddess' from the Jomon period. Female figurines like this with the hands on the hips or waist are common in Jomon culture.
 


Figurines from the Kulli culture of Baluchistan associated with ear discs and zebu figurines.
Related to pre-Harappan sites.
 


Figurines from the Harappa period.
 


Dagger hilts from Dong Son and Lang Vac.  The practice of ear elongation using heavy rings is still practiced among the Punans of Borneo today.


Ax-head from Roti in Bronze Age Indonesia. Like Dong Son and Harappan images, feathered headresses are common. Stylized arms are in position similar to other images above. Dong Son styling.  (From Peter Bellwood, Man's Conquest of the Pacific, 1979)


Bronze bracelet with pellet bells (Late Period Ban Chiang).  According to White, following Newman, spiral design bells like these are still made using the lost wax method by groups in the Philippines. A bell of similiar morphology, but different design patterns occurs broadly across Asia including the Indian subcontinent.

Image Gallery Part II
 

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